To Olympic Peninsula 7-8-13

Taking the guys to the airport – let’s stop to see the Japanese Garden. Nice little spot, but, um, not what we expected after seeing the one in Montreal’s Botanic Garden. The “12-story pagoda” here was Barbie-sized, not human. Fed the koi.

After the airport, we took the long, long road south and around the Olympic Peninsula to get to Forks – now famous and kitchy as the setting for the Twilight books/movies (picked because it’s the cloudiest, grayest town in the US).

Before reaching Forks, we stopped to see the World’s Biggest Sitka Spruce – and there were Mark, Jane, and our travel buddies, who had come straight from the wedding hotel.  1,000 yr old tree, 191 ft tall, 59′ circumference. The massiveness is hard to fathom. We headed off to a nature trail to begin to appreciate the old growth rainforest along Willaby Creek.

“Man did not weave the web of life. He is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web he does to himself.” Chief Seattle

Then we stopped to hike up to the giant red cedar tree. The tree is largely dead, hollow, and massive. Then we’re on to first beach and our first view of the Pacific. It had been hot and sunny in the rainforest, but the coast is foggy, cool, misty, eerie with the rock formations climbing out of the surf.

4th beach was the best – lots of formations, at low tide, making for a pack-with-sea-life tide pool – mussels, anemones, and starfish ranging from orange to purple! Oh, look, 2 bald eagles in that tree! What a miraculous spot!

Final stop was Ruby Beach – with more rock spires.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: