Posts tagged sequoia

Sequoia National Park – 6/4/17

We stayed in the town of Three Rivers, about 10 miles outside the south Ash Mountain entrance to Sequoia National Park.

You’re at about 1700′ elevation at the entrance, sitting in traffic:

but climb to over 6,000′. We counted over 25 switchbacks/hairpin turns on Generals Highway with speed limit at 10 – 15 MPH. Because the road looks like this on the GPS:

Park map, and signs, say “Vehicles longer than 22 feet (including trailers) not advised.” Glad we never did this road at night!
First stop this day was Crescent Meadow, which you get to on the shuttle, passing this tunnel log.
John Muir called this meadow the Gem of the Sierras – the meadow leads to a lovely woods trail:

And wildlife! A black bear (with brown fur) just 20 yards off the trail:

The trail continues in among the sequoias:

We got to Tharp’s Log, a cabin built out of a hollowed-out fallen giant sequoia log in the Giant Forest. Hale Tharp grazed cattle in the meadow, and led early battles against logging in the area.  John Muir visited and stayed at Tharp’s log cabin.

Meadow near Tharp’s Log:

And the Giant Forest beyond:

More wildlife – a deer on the trail, and he just kept hiking near us:

We crossed the High Sierra Trail, but didn’t take the 60 mile trek to Mt. Whitney:

The rings on a cross section not only tell the tree’s age, but also the weather each year – narrow rings mean dry years, wide rings were damp:

Headed straight to General Sherman, the largest tree (by volume) in the world:

You can’t zoom out enough to photograph the whole thing:

From General Sherman, we took the Congress Trail, so named because of the clusters of sequoias – dubbed the House and Senate groupings. And hiked with another deer:

Many of the trees had fire damage, but this one was burned dead:

There’s a little waterfall along and under the path:

You can see a tree tunnel on the far side:

And then we reach The President tree:

This group is The Senate:

And The House:

And this might be Lincoln:

Fallen sequoias make great playgrounds, as we reach that tunnel tree:

Little lavender flowers blanket the forest floor:

How big? See this medium-sized tree outside the Museum? It would be 9 yards short of a football field, and would block 3 lanes of traffic on a highway.

On our way out, I loved these mosaic stone walls (that kept us from crashing over the edge on all those switchbacks), and then we got the view of Moro Rock, which lots of folks climb.

Near the exit, we stopped at Hospital Rock, which, according to Wikipedia, was once home to 500 Potwisha Native Americans, as early as 1350. In 1860, Hale Tharp and John Swanson were exploring the Giant Forest when Swanson injured his leg. Swanson was transported here where his injury was treated by local Indians. Tharp gave the spot its name after a second similar incident.

That red marking on the straight rock wall? Petroglyphs!

This “Community Kitchen” slab was where the native women ground acorns into flour – you can see the grinding indentations:

Then there’s a trail down to the waterfall, with stone steps built by the Civilian Conservation Corp:

Shrimp enchiladas for dinner:

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Kings Canyon National Park – 6/3/17

Kings Canyon National Park is less than 3 hours south of Mariposa. We stopped at one of the roadside fruit stands for a pile of peaches.

We reached the ‘thumb’ of Kings Canyon at the Big Stump Entrance, hit the Grant Grove Village Visitor Center, and headed behind the camping to Panoramic Point – a great spot but not even on the map!

Sat on a bench, enjoying the panorama, eating our sandwiches.

A gecko:

Kings Canyon/Sequoia National Parks are managed together as one park, set aside to protect the massive sequoias, most of which were destroyed by greedy loggers, who went bankrupt:

With this tour bus in view, you can get a sense of the scale of these sequoias:

Took in the North Grove Loop to Sunset Trail:

You really need a panoramic lens – or a wide angle – to capture the size of these sequoias.

This view of dogwood blossoms, sunlight, and sequoias felt like I’d fallen into a Monet – what would he have done with this landscape?

More trail, showing blackened bark. Old growth sequoias have such thick bark that fire seldom kills these trees; and fire is necessary for new growth – sequoia pine cones don’t open and drop their seeds without the heat from forest fires.

Most folks who hit this section of the park skip the near-solitude of the trail we just did, and head straight to the 1/2-mile paved path to the General Grant Tree.

The tree was named in 1867 after Ulysses S. Grant, Union Army general and the 18th President of the United States. President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed it the “Nation’s Christmas Tree” on April 28, 1926. On March 29, 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower declared the tree a “National Shrine”, a memorial to those who died in war. It is the only living object to be so declared.

The trail has other points of interest, including this Fallen Monarch tree trunk, big enough to walk through upright:

Centennial Stump was left after this 24′ diameter trunk was sliced up and transported east for the Philadelphia Exhibition of 1876 –  where the easterners thought it was a hoax:

Grant Tree itself – the 2nd largest in the world:

Driving out to our hotel in Three Rivers, we get the views:

Moonrise over the pool and spa at Western Adventure Lodge:

 

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